Friday Link Lovin’

snow blog

We had another snow day here in NYC, but luckily nothing too crazy. Just enough to brighten the streets and make everything just a bit quieter and lovely. I spent this snowy afternoon with my bf having the most delicious brunch in BK at The Farm (read: mimosas, bacon and french fries). How are you spending your Friday?

-Next week is Valentines Day! For those staying in, check out Gina’s dinner plan for inspiration.

-I’m watching the Super Bowl for the first time this Sunday. I’m very excited to finally join the club and also have an excuse to make these dates (but with cheese. duh.) and this squash.

-On February 15th, Grammy viewers will get a taste of being in the Room Where it Happens.

-Sarah Koenig is revisiting Serial Season 1 this week. She’s watching Adnan Syed’s hearing in Baltimore and doing daily recaps here.

-Speaking of podcasts, Linda Holmes and crew discuss musicals on t.v. this week. I somehow missed Grease Live. Shameful, I know.

-If the new doc series from Netflix and Michael Pollan is anything like A Chef’s Table, I am alllllllll in.

-I, too, have a love affair with crispy chicken skin.

-In this week’s NYMag, Lisa Miller makes a compassionate case for people with disabilities and their right to have children. Really eye opening stuff.

-My very witty friend Shannon is documenting her Experiments in Happiness on the Huff Post this year and January was her “no alcohol” month. She killed it, even though the universe conspired against her.

Enjoy the weekend, my friends!

xo

xtina

 

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Friday Quote Love

There is a quote I’ve keep on my wall for years. It’s from Mark Bittman, a food journalist for the NYTimes. The context of the quote surrounded a picture that surfaced of his home kitchen in NYC. It was the size of a shoebox. A SHOEBOX.

It’s a tiny kitchen, even by New York standards. But he’s been working in that kitchen for years, cooking for himself and yes, entertaining dinner guests. This man does food for a living. And yet, his “work station” was about as ordinary as any other human.

Needless to say, the internet was shocked. In response, he said:

Runners run and writers write, cooks cook. Under pretty much any circumstance.

Upon reading, I immediately issued forth that involuntary exhale which told me my mind was just blown.

I fell in love with this idea and for the simplicity in how it was communicated.

The Circumstance is secondary. The Drive is everything.

Sure, the right equipment and environment are sometimes super necessary.

But if I’m at an airport, and I don’t have a yoga mat, and I feel like I need yoga, I’m not gonna say, ohhhh I don’t have my matt, there are too many people around, it would look weird, I can’t.

A yogi yogas. Pretty much under any circumstance.

A writing class, for SURE would help me get my writing in gear and would make me accountable to write MORE. But should that stop me from writing right now? Like the man says:

A writer writes. Under any circumstance.

A mac book and a rad microphone would certainly help me make my media page kick ass. But should not having those things stop me from putting my voice out there anyway? Because a singer sings. Pretty much under any circumstance.

An actor goes to the audition. Under any circumstance.

The health conscious food nerd packs a lunch. Pretty much under any circumstance.

The Trader Joe’s devotee goes to Trader Joe’s. Under any circumstance (read: even if it’s Sunday).

The frugal person keeps a budget, under any circumstance.

The walker walks.

The optimist smiles.

The traveler travels.

Under any circumstance.
The drive to do something is paramount and has the power to cut through any “less than ideal” environment. Because it’s always the person who does the doing. And the person is always stronger than any old circumstance. The mind is a powerful thing, and perhaps changing your thoughts, will actually change the circumstance.

Sunday Morning

Max Ehrmann’s “Desiderata”.

Desiderata

 

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,

and remember what peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible without surrender

be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly;

and listen to others, even the dull and the ignorant;

they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952.